Hourglass Problem

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Hourglass Problem Game Online - Play Free Hourglasses Logic Games

Hourglass Problem is a fun logic game. Measure 15 and 24 minutes with hourglasses of 7 and 11 minutes. Seize your precious time and don't let it slip away in the hourglasses! Your goal in this online logic problem game is to measure 15 and 24 minutes by using a 7-minute and an 11-minute hourglass. You will be given the two hourglasses in the game, and you can click to reverse the hourglasses. The numbers at the top and the bottom of the hourglasses indicate the corresponding minutes in which the sand will flow. Click the Start button on the left of the screen when you are ready, and the sand in the hourglasses will start to descend from the top. When the sand in one of the hourglasses has run out, the other hourglass will stop. The minutes measured are shown at the bottom of the hourglasses as well as on the left of the screen. Then you may reverse the positions of the hourglasses again and continue the process, until the required minutes are measured. Take your time and make it count! Have Fun!

Play Hourglass Problem game online for free today

Do you like to solve logic puzzles, and do you also enjoy to play a fun puzzle game online? If you are in the same mood as us today, then you probably would like to play our free Hourglass Problem game online.

How to play Hourglass Problem game online

Use your mouse to play this online logic game.

What is an Hourglass

According to WikiPedia an hourglass is a mechanical device used to measure the passage of time. It comprises two glass bulbs connected vertically by narrow neck that allows a regulated trickle of material (historically sand) from the upper bulb to the lower one. Factors affecting the time interval measured include the sand quantity, the sand coarseness, the bulb size, and the neck width. Hourglasses may be reused indefinitely by inverting the bulbs once the upper bulb is empty. The origin of the hourglass is unclear. Its predecessor the clepsydra, or water clock, may have been invented in ancient Egypt. According to the American Institute of New York, the clepsammia or sand-glass was invented at Alexandria about 150 BC.

Fun Logic Game Facts

The links between logic and games go back a long way, and we all love Logic Games because when we find the solution it makes sense. Not only are they fun and challenging but they also help develop young kids brain, and help grown-ups keep their brain stay sharp. According to Stanford University there are close links between games and teaching. Games between two players, of the kind where one player wins and one loses, became a familiar tool in many branches of logic during the second half of the twentieth century. Important examples are semantic games used to define truth, back-and-forth games used to compare structures, and dialogue games to express (and perhaps explain) formal proofs. From the point of view of game theory, the main games that logicians study are not at all typical. They normally involve just two players, they often have infinite length, the only outcomes are winning and losing, and no probabilities are attached to actions or outcomes. Just as in classical game theory, the definition of logical games serves as a clothes horse that we can hang other concepts onto.

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